Whats New Category: Award Winning

Award Winning Teen Books!

Yesterday morning the Youth Media Awards were held at the American Library’s Association‘s Midwinter Conference.  These awards are held annually and recognize some of the best books written for the year for kids and teens.  Check out the recording of the awards ceremony and then take a look at the winning Teen books below!

 

The Michael L. Printz Award

Given for excellence in literature written for young adults.

Winner:

I'll Give You the Sun book cover

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Four Printz Honor Books also were named:

AndWeStayThe Carnival At Bray book covergrasshopper jungleThisOneSummer

And We Stay by Jenny Hubbard

The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley

Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki

This One Summer also was named a Caldecott Honor Book: the Randolph Caldecott Medal is for the most distinguished American picture book for children.

 

William C. Morris Award

Given for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens.

Winner:

Gabi

Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero

Four other books were finalists for the award:

The Carnival At Bray book coverthe Story of Owen book coverthe scar boys book coverstrangebeautifulsorrows

The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley

The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim by E.K. Johnston

The Scar Boys by Len Vlahos

The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton

 

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

Winner:

Popular

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen

Four other books were finalists for the award:

laughingatmynightmareFamilyRominovIdaMTarbellPortChicago50

Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw

The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion & the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

The Family Romanov was also named a Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor Book, for most distinguished informational book for children and teens:

Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business—and Won! by Emily Arnold McCully

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin

 

2015 list of Best Fiction for Young Adults (BFYA)

These books, recommended for ages 12-18, meet the criteria of both quality literature and appeal to teens, while comprising a wide range of genres, styles and subjects. Click here to find the full list!

Top Ten list from the final selections:

crossover book coverThe Carnival At Bray book covervangothe Story of Owen book coverGospel of WinterWe Were Liars book coverYoungElitesI'll Give You the Sun book coverjackabyNoggin

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley
Vango by Timothee de Fombelle
The Story of Owen Dragonslayer of Trondheim by  E.K. Johnston
The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely
We Were Liars by e. lockhart
The Young Elites by Marie Lu
I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
Jackaby by William Ritter
Noggin by John Corey Whaley

 

Coretta Scott King Honor Book:  The Coretta Scott Kind Book Award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

HowitWentDown

How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

 

John Steptoe New Talent Author Award: The John Steptoe New Talent Award recognizes new talent and is determined by the Coretta Scott King Task Force:

When I Was the Greatest written by Jason Reynolds

 

Schneider Family Book Award’s Teen Selection: for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:

GirlsLikeUs

Girls Like Us by Gail Giles

 

Stonewall Honor Books:  given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience:

BeyondMagentaI'll Give You the Sun book cover

Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Permanent Record by Leslie Stella

permanent recordPermanent Record by Leslie Stella

Badi Hessamizadeh has just voluntarily left his public high school because his solution to ending the everyday, intense bullying he experienced was to blow up a toilet. Badi’s reputation as a terrorist after the toilet explosion, has made the bullying against him unbearable. So, Badi’s father changed his name– now Badi is known as Bud Hess– and transferred Badi to a private academy. Can life be different for Badi, now Bud, at his new school or will he face the same prejudices as before?

Permanent Record is a pretty compelling read, not only because it deals with the issue of racial profiling and bullying, but also because Badi is a flawed character.  He doesn’t make the right decisions, and while at first it is hard to understand Badi’s reasoning for acting out, as you continue reading you get to know Badi.  You understand that he is struggling with anxiety and depression, and the bullying that he has to endure at school is horrible.  Added to all of his struggles is that Badi has as Iranian-American is a post-911 world.  I was surprised at how much this book moved me, and also how much I got to know the character of Badi and his struggles.  By the end of the novel, I didn’t expect it to end the way that it did, but now I can think of no way that I would have rather it ended.  If you are in the mood for a realistic and thought-provoking read, you should definitely pick up Permanent Record.  Click here to find it in the Library!

Permanent Record is also this year’s Suburban Mosaic Teen Novel.  To learn more about the Suburban Mosaic Reading program, which “seeks to confront issues of racial and social justice and promote cross-cultural understanding through literature”, then click here to be directed to the website.  To celebrate the selection of Permanent Record as the 2014 Suburban Mosaic Teen Novel, the Library will be hosting An Evening with Leslie Stella on Monday, September 15.  Leslie Stella will talk about her novel, writing, and there will also be a book signing.

2013 Award Winning Books

This morning the American Library Association’s Young Adult division, YALSA, announced this year’s award-winning books and audiobooks.  I was lucky to be at the Youth Media Awards ceremony, since I am in Seattle, WA, for the Midwinter Conference!  Let me tell you the award ceremony was very exciting and a lot of fun!  Check out a couple photos at the end of this post.  Click here to get official press releases of the winners.  Below is a list of the teen titles that won.  Just click on the title to see if you can find it at the Library!

Prinz Award for Excellence in YA Literature ?

Winner: In Darkness by Nick Lake

Honor: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Honor: Dodger by Terry Pratchett

Honor: The White Bicycle by Beverly Brenna

Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award (Honoring a significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature)

Awarded to: Tamora Pierce

Click here to learn more about Tamora Pierce.  Pierce has written a few different book series, but to get started I suggest you check out her Song of the Lioness series or her Beka Cooper series at the Library!

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

Winner: Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

Finalist: Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal

Finalist: Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 by Phillip Hoose

Finalist: Titanic: Voices from the Disaster by Deborah Hopkinson

Finalist: We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson

William C. Morris Award (Honoring a work by a first time author)

Winner: Seraphina by Rachel Hartman

Finalist: Wonder Show by Hannah Barnaby

Finalist: Love and Other Perishable Items by Laura Buzo

Finalist: After the Snow by S.D. Crockett

Finalist: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Alex Awards (Given to ten books written for adults that have teen appeal)

Caring is Creepy by David Zimmerman

Girlchild by Tupelo Hassman

Juvenile in Justice by Richard Ross*

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf

One Shot at Forever by Chris Ballard

Pure by Julianna Baggott

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple

The Odyssey Award (Awarded to the best audiobooks for children and/or young adults)

Winner: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, narrated by Kate Rudd

Honor: Artemis Fowl: the Last Guardian by Eoin Colfer, narrated by Nathaniel Parker

Honor: Ghost Knight by Cornelia Funke, narrated by Elliot Hill

Honor: Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama, narrated by Katherine Kellgren

 

Mildred L. Batchelder Award (Awarded for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States)

Winner: My Family for the War by Anne C. Voorhoeve, translated by Tammi Reichel

Honor: A Game for Swallows: to die, to leave, to return by Zeina Abirached, translated by Edward Gauvin

Honor: Son of a Gun by Anne de Graaf, translated by Anne de Graaf

 

Pura Beleré Award (Presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work celebrates the Latino cultural experience)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

Schneider Family Book Awards (Honoring a work that emphasizes children or teens with a disability)

Teen: Somebody Please Tell Me Who I Am by Harry Mazer and Peter Lerangis

Stonewall Book Awards for Children and Young Adult Literature (This award is sponsored by ALA’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table)

Winner: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Honor: Drama by Raina Telgemeier

Honor: Gone, Gone, Gone by Hannah Moskowitz

Honor: October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard by Lesléa Newman

Honor: Sparks: The Epic, Completely True Blue, (Almost) Holy Quest of Debbie by S.J. Adams*

 

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award (This award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults)

Winner: Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney

Honor: No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

 

ALA you media award slide

*We’re sorry, these books are not available at MPPL.

2011 Cybils announced yesterday!

Yesterday, the 2011 Cybils were announced.  The Cybils are the children’s and young adult bloggers literary awards.  According to their website, “instead of telling kids what we think they should be reading, we take a look at what they already are reading (or likely will read) — and then pick out the best of them.”  Check out the teen titles that won below and click on the cover or the title link to find them in the Library!

Stupid Fast book coverYoung Adult Fiction Winner

Stupid Fast by Geoff Herbach

Just before his sixteenth birthday, Felton Reinstein has a sudden growth spurt that turns him from a small, jumpy, picked-on boy with the nickname of “Squirrel Nut” to a powerful athlete, leading to new friends, his first love, and the courage to confront his family’s problems.

 

Fantasy and Science Fiction Winner

Blood Red Road by Moira Young

In a distant future, eighteen-year-old Lugh is kidnapped, and while his twin sister Saba and nine-year-old Emmi are trailing him across bleak Sandsea they are captured, too, and taken to brutal Hopetown, where Saba is forced to be a cage fighter until new friends help plan an escape.

 

Graphic Novel Winner

Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Anya, embarrassed by her Russian immigrant family and self-conscious about her body, has given up on fitting in at school but falling down a well and making friends with the ghost there just may be worse.

 

 

Poetry Winner

Requiem: Poems of the Terezin Ghetto by Paul B. Janeczko

Presents a collection of poetry inspired by the history of the people in the Terezín concentration camp during the holocaust.